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Chalmers

Chalmers University of Technology, founded in 1829 in Gothenburg, conducts research and education in a wide range of disciplines, in close collaboration with industry and society. Chalmers is one of Sweden's largest engineering schools with about 10,600 students and 2,200 employees.

The Chalmers group involved in OpenSuperQ includes both experimentalists and theorists. Chalmers is the central node in the Wallenberg Center for Quantum Technology (WACQT), a €100M national project for 2018–2027 encompassing all the four pillars of quantum technology and with a focus on building a Swedish quantum computer.

Main tasks in the project

Within OpenSuperQ, Chalmers leads the work on developing the application algorithms, which will be executed on the OpenSuperQ quantum computer. Together with the other theory partners, Chalmers will develop algorithms for quantum chemistry, optimization, and machine learning (WP1). Chalmers experimentalists lead the efforts to improve quantum coherence in chips with multiple coupled qubits, including device design, process development, fabrication, packaging, and testing (WP2); this work is done together with ETHZ and VTT. Chalmers and VTT develop traveling-wave parametric amplifiers (WP3). Chalmers also has a major responsibility for evaluating the performance of 2-qubit gates and to develop the advanced qubit control methods that will mitigate systematic and incoherent errors in order to reach the targeted gate fidelities (WP4).

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Expertise of staff members involved

Assoc. Prof. Jonas Bylander
Assoc. Prof. Jonas Bylander

Career: Faculty member at Chalmers Dept. MC2 since 2013, “Docent” habilitation (Assoc. Prof.) in 2015; Research Scientist, MIT 2012; Postdoctoral Associate, MIT 2008-2011; PhD in Physics, Chalmers 2007; MSc, Chalmers 2002; undergraduate studies also at École Polytechnique (France) and Stockholm University.

Major grants: Swedish Research Council’s Young Researcher Grant, 2014-2017; Marie Curie Career Integration Grant, 2015-2018; Wallenberg Foundation Project Grant (co-PI), 2015-2019; Wallenberg Center for Quantum Technology (co-PI), 2018-2027.

Main contributions: Quantum coherence, open-loop control, and noise mitigation and characterization of superconducting qubits; first measurement of electric current by the counting of single electrons. Current research focus: Superconducting qubits, microwave quantum optics, parametric effects in the quantum regime, and mesoscopic electronic transport.

Prof. Per Delsing
Prof. Per Delsing

Professor at the Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience MC2, Head of the Quantum Technology Laboratory

Per Delsing is a full professor at Chalmers University of Technology since 1997. His research focuses on quantum properties of superconducting devices. With artificial atoms based on superconducting circuits he studies quantum optics on chip by investigating how these “atoms" interact with microwave photons. Placing the artificial atoms on piezoelectric surfaces it is also possible to study how the atoms interact with phonons if the form of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs). He also studies quantum information using superconducting qubits, with the final goal to build a quantum computer.

Per is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (KVA), and of the Royal Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA). He is also a Distinguished Professor appointed by the Swedish Research Council (VR), Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and a Wallenberg Scholar.

Prof. Göran Johansson
Prof. Göran Johansson

Professor at the Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience MC2, Head of the Applied Quantum Physics Laboratory

"I am fascinated by quantum physics, both fundamental aspects as well as applied quantum technology. One example of an interesting fundamental effect is the dynamical Casimir effect, where photons are created out of the vacuum by a mirror accelerating to velocities close to the speed of light. A more applied question is how to build a quantum computer, where the quantum mechanical phenomena superposition and entanglement are used to solve problems that are beyond the capabilities of today’s supercomputers.

A working quantum computer can find detailed properties of large biological molecules, which can lead to new medicines and other novel medical treatments. A quantum computer could also enhance artificial intelligence and gives us qualitatively new possibilities to find structures in large set of data and find better solutions to optimization problems, such as traffic control to avoid congestions."

Head of the Applied Quantum Physics Laboratory at MC2 and also co-director of Chalmers' Excellence Initiative Nano.

Prizes: Edlundska Priset 2016 by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Albert Wallin Science Prize 2015 by the Royal Society of Arts and Sciences in Gothenburg.

Prof. Göran Wendin
Prof. Göran Wendin

Professor at the Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience MC2, Quantum Technology Laboratory

"My research deals with the physics of computing, from quantum computers to biological systems. The development since the beginning of this century has been remarkable, and there is a vast field of exciting opportunities opening up. My research has two main goals: (1) to contribute to creating a useful superconducting quantum computer for digital simulation of advanced problems in Chemistry; and (2) to develop educational material for explaining how modern physics - including quantum physics - will influence biology and medicine to create great interdisciplinary progress. I share my research interests with a wide scientific community. I would say that these topics and results are already of great interest to the general public as well as to industry. We are now at the stage of

“Quantum education” and will soon enter a stage of “quantum applications”, from toy examples to serious applications. How this will affect Society remains to be discovered. Nevertheless, it will surely fundamentally influence the general technology level."

Assistant Prof. Martin Rahm
Assistant Prof. Martin Rahm

Martin Rahm is passionate about theoretical predictions of stability, properties, and realistic routes to the synthesis of as of yet unknown materials. To this end, his group is developing frameworks and methods to further chemical thinking on topics such as chemical bonding, reactivity, chemistry under high pressure, and electronic structures of extended materials. Martin Rahm is also working on multidisciplinary origin-of-life-related questions in prebiotic chemistry and planetary science, focusing on understanding the chemical evolution of different organic polymers in the solar system.